Let’s put a hard truth out there: anti-hunters are pro-extinction.

The endangered species of the world are effectively protected only by those who provide conservation dollars.

Historically, the overwhelming supermajority of those conservation dollars comes from fees and permits collected from hunters by government agencies and private initiatives from pro-hunting groups. Hunters pay the bills for habitat conservation, refurbishment, and herd management, and precious little funding comes from bleeding-heart, tree-hugging activists that love nature from the safety of their iPads in their climate-controlled suburban homes sipping lattes with their woven hemp wallets slammed shut as they sing Hakuna Matata.

This upcoming Saturday, the Dallas Safari Club will be auctioning off one hunting permit provided by the┬áNamibian government to hunt a single black rhino, with the auction expected to raise…

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…for the ┬áconservation of the endangered species, not to mention bringing tens of thousands of dollars to the local economy and meat for villagers (almost all of Africa’s big game animals harvested by hunters are eaten by locals, including lions).

Logically, anti-hunting extremists who never set outside and who have a Disneyfied view of nature have completely lost their minds, and are now issuing death threats against the very people who are doing the most to keep the species from going extinct.

Members of a Texas hunting club have received death threats over plans to auction off a permit to kill a critically endangered black rhinoceros, despite insisting all the proceeds will go towards conservation efforts.
The FBI is reviewing multiple threats made against members of the Dallas Safari Club which plans to auction the permit granted to them by the African country of Namibia on Saturday.
The club’s executive director, Ben Carter, said about a dozen threatening messages were sent by email and posted on the group’s website.

‘I’ve had death threats on my family,’ Mr Carter said. ‘We’ve had a number of death threats to our members and (threats about) what would happen if we sell the permit.
The club’s executive director, Ben Carter, said about a dozen threatening messages were sent by email and posted on the group’s website

The club’s executive director, Ben Carter, said about a dozen threatening messages were sent by email and posted on the group’s website.

‘Some crazy stuff,’ he said.

FBI spokesman Katherine Chaumont said: ‘The FBI is aware of the threats,’ Chaumont said. ‘If a violation of federal law is determined, additional action or investigation as necessary will take place.’

Sadly, I have very little hope that this politicized FBI will do more than pay lip service to investigating the threats against the Dallas Safari Club, and will frankly be stunned if they bring charges against anyone, even as easy as it is to track most cybercrimes due to the low-tech stupidity of the kind of people who make threats over the Internet.

Hopefully the eventual winner of the Dallas Safari Club auction will put the permit up for immediate sale to any anti-hunting group that will pony up the expected $1 million dollars the permit is expected to bring in, plus the $50,000-$75,000 that the hunt would have generated for the local economy.

The odds of any anti-hunting group actually opening their wallets, of course, is incredibly remote.

Death threats are cheap. Actually ponying up the dough?

Leave that to the real conservationists, who are almost always hunters.