In October of 2013, Jerome M. Hauer, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s director of homeland security for New York, drew a gun and used the laser pointer [my bold]:

Jerome M. Hauer, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s director of homeland security, took out his handgun and used the laser sighting device attached to the barrel as a pointer in a presentation to a foreign delegation, according to public officials. It happened Oct. 24 in Albany at the highly secure state emergency operations center belowState Police headquarters.

These officials, one of whom claimed to be an eyewitness, said that three Swedish emergency managers in the delegation were rattled when the gun’s laser tracked across one of their heads before Hauer found the map of New York, at which he wanted to point.

While Hauer broke multiple laws—including apparent felonies, such as assault with a deadly weapon—he wasn’t fired, demoted, or even punished.

Instead, Governor Andrew Cuomo unilaterally exempted Hauer from the law after the fact:

The Cuomo administration has obtained a waiver to allow the head of the state Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services to carry a handgun at work.

The required sign-off from a law barring state employees from packing a weapon at their workplace came from the state Office of GeneralServices four days after the Times Union published a story about DHSES Commissioner Jerome M. Hauer using his handgun’s laser sighting attachment as a pointer in a meeting with a Swedish delegation.

Cuomo defended Hauer at a news conference Wednesday. The governor said he’s comfortable with commissioners carrying weapons to work as long as they have gun permits. He qualified the response by adding “if they are licensed and in that field of work.”

Hauer is not a law enforcement officer or working in law enforcement, although his official vehicle has emergency lights and sirens.

Despite the lack of a waiver before January, several witnesses said he has been carrying a gun on the job since Cuomo appointed him in 2011.

People have seen Hauer with his gun on him in state buildings, including 633 Third Ave. in Manhattan, where the governor has offices, and at division headquarters at the Harriman campus in Albany.

Hauer’s practice of arming himself at work was in full view when he took out his weapon during a meeting with the Swedish delegation during an October conference at the state emergency services center, the bunker beneath the State Police headquarters in Albany.

Remind me… are ex post facto laws legal in the United States?

I wonder how long it will be before Jerome “The Albany Kid” Hauer, who is not a law enforcement officer, nor apparently very bright, responsible,  or well-trained, manages to shoot someone during a PowerPoint presentation.