Nucla Town Board member Richard Craig cleans a shotgun in his home. (William Woody, Special to The Denver Post)
Nucla Town Board member Richard Craig cleans a shotgun in his home. (William Woody, Special to The Denver Post)

It looks like the small town of Nucla, Colorado, is taking a stand on the issue of gun rights:

The Venus Stylin’ beauty salon is one of the few businesses in this town where the heads of hunted animals don’t stare glassy-eyed from the walls. But that doesn’t mean that this is a zone free of the gun-rights fervor that grips Nucla.

“We should all have guns, lots of them,” opined stylist Traciena Johannsen as she painted highlights on the hair of a client who spoke up from beneath the tent of foil on her head to say she has two guns. In fact, she shot a wild turkey with one of them last week.

Guns have put Nucla in the national Second Amendment spotlight since the Nucla Town Board on May 8 passed the first — and only — municipal ordinance in Colorado requiring heads of households to have guns, and ammunition, “in order to provide for and protect the safety, security and general welfare of the town and its inhabitants.”

Bill Long is the only member of the town board who voted against the “Family Protection Order”, and he only opposed it because he’s against passing unnecessary laws of any kind… he has plenty of firearms of his own.

The law is modeled upon a similar law passed by Kennesaw, Georgia  that made national news in 1982.

Neither the Nucla ordinance nor the original Kennesaw model are enforced, but are simply statements by proud gun owning cultures in a pair of small towns that effectively mean, “don’t mess with us.”