Dear Readers,

We wrap up our month on the Korean War by featuring an army medic who did not know the meaning of ‘enough’ when it came to his duty to those men with whom he served.

There are Korean War vets all around us yet. Remember them, please, as their war has gone largely forgotten by the majority of the population for far too long.

Make the most of your day!


Womack picture

 Bryant E. Womack

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Medical Company, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Near Sokso-ri, Korea, 12 March 1952.
Entered service at: Mill Springs, N.C.
Birth: Mill Springs, N.C. G.O. No.: 5, 12 January 1953.

Pfc. Womack distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Pfc. Womack was the only medical aid man attached to a night combat patrol when sudden contact with a numerically superior enemy produced numerous casualties. Pfc. Womack went immediately to their aid, although this necessitated exposing himself to a devastating hail of enemy fire, during which he was seriously wounded. Refusing medical aid for himself, he continued moving among his comrades to administer aid. While he was aiding 1 man, he was again struck by enemy mortar fire, this time suffering the loss of his right arm. Although he knew the consequences should immediate aid not be administered, he still refused aid and insisted that all efforts be made for the benefit of others that were wounded. Although unable to perform the task himself, he remained on the scene and directed others in first aid techniques. The last man to withdraw, he walked until he collapsed from loss of blood, and died a few minutes later while being carried by his comrades. The extraordinary heroism, outstanding courage, and unswerving devotion to his duties displayed by Pfc. Womack reflect the utmost distinction upon himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the U.S. Army.


Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, N.C.