Connecticut’s anti-gun politicians (in both parties) and the media are beside themselves in a quivering rage.

Though they passed a ¬†blatantly unconstitutional law requiring citizens to register both their “modern muskets” and the standard-capacity magazines associated with such firearms, the response of the citizenry has been an overwhelming refusal to comply.

No one knows for sure precisely how many firearms labeled “assault weapons” by the state exist in Connecticut and so a precise estimate is impossible to obtain, but the most common estimate is that a minimum of 86-percent of citizens did not register their semi-automatic firearms as required by law, and that figure may be as high as nine in 10. Standard-capacity magazines are also required to be registered with the state under the same law, and non-compliance there may be even higher, in excess of 95-percent.

Predictably, the state and it’s big government supporters are stunned.

Connecticut politicians have become so adjusted to docile citizens compliantly forfeiting their rights to more government intrusion that they simply assumed a law setting up the registration of firearms for their eventual confiscation would be obeyed without question.

They’re now scrambling for what they would term “an appropriate response.”

Behind closed doors, we can assume that they are fuming, and would like nothing more than to arrest each and every gun-owning scofflaw within the state at gunpoint, with an appropriate show of overwhelming police presence at each. To date, they’re limited to the potential threat of sending out a strongly worded letter, but have balked at even talking that step.


Perhaps they’re sobered by the reality, of knowing that they are hopelessly over-matched based on raw numbers alone, and they do not dare inflame the population further.¬†As of 2011, there were 92 municipal police departments in Connecticut, employing fewer than 6,700 officers, and the state police have 1,120 troopers, a total of roughly 7,820 state and local law enforcement officers.

There are at least 350,000 “assault weapons” in Connecticut according to very conservative estimates, belonging to somewhere north of 80,000 and likely more than 100,000 gun owners.

Any attempt by Connecticut police forces to start searching and arresting suspected “assault weapon” owners would spread to social media within minutes, and the outcome is likely to be unpleasant for all concerned, with the possibility that the current standoff could turn into something much more deadly and unpredictable.

Connecticut’s residents have the inalienable constitutional right to own weapons of military utility, for the purposes of defense against enemies both foreign and domestic.

The Hartford Courant is agitating that citizens who have refused to comply with this blatantly unconstitutional law “should be prepared to face the consequences.”

They’ve rather obviously forgotten their history. Le’ts hope that Connecticut’s government isn’t equally as unaware of their precarious position.