Since the 1980s, “rivers of blood” have constantly promised by gun control supporters as (real) common sense firearms legislation has been passed into law. Unfortunately for them, that promise of extensive violence  has always, without exception, gone unfulfilled.

Their shrill 30-year losing streak has been confirmed yet again when a Florida man took advantage of a new gun law to stop an attempted murderer in his tracks:

One of the five new gun bills that Gov. Rick Scott signed into law last month already has been used by an armed citizen who is being hailed as a hero for stopping a violent stabbing.

The gun owner, Edwin Sullivan, fired a warning shot causing the attacker to freeze, which deputies said saved the victim’s life.

The “Threatened Use of Force” bill, which was also known somewhat incorrectly as the “Warning Shot Bill,” was one of five gun bills pushed by the pro-gun activists during the last legislative session.

It allows an armed citizen to display, or point, their defensive firearm at an assailant without criminal charges, assuming the threatened use of force is justifiable.

Although “warning shots” are not specifically mentioned, they’re also covered by the new law.

Amusingly, reporter Lee Williams gets it right that the new legislation doesn’t  specifically mention warning shots, but then screws up royally and reiterates the myth that the law came “too late” to save Marissa Alexander, who is currently facing retrial. Alexander did not fire a warning shot, and does not deserve protection under “stand your ground” nor castle doctrine provisions.

Alexander had a fight with Rico Gray, left the home, retrieved a firearm from her car in the garage, re-entered the home, said “I’ve got something for your ass!” and fired a shot at Gray that entered the wall behind him head-high.

A bullet that whizzes by the head of the victim is a miss, not a warning shot.

The bullet Marissa Alexander fired wasn't a warning shot. It was a killing shot that missed.
The bullet Marissa Alexander fired wasn’t a warning shot. It was a head-high killing shot that missed.

Alexander faces retrial for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The jury in her first trial convicted her in just 12 minutes.