There is nothing more typical than a supporter of gun control asserting the lie that, “guns are only good for one thing: killing.”

The reality of the matter is that firearms are useful for a great many things, from informal target shooting (plinking), to various kinds of shooting competitions sanctioned by national and international bodies, to the preservation of liberty and the protection of our lives.

It is a matter of indisputable fact that firearms are used in defensive gun uses (DGUs) every single day in the United States, and that they are used (depending on the academic source you would like to quote) somewhere between 500,000 and 3+ million times a year to stop criminal activity.

In the supermajority of these instances, the mere display of a firearm is enough to stop a criminal in his tracks. In a smaller but still important number of defensive gun uses, a warning shot is enough to convince a criminal that he needs to be somewhere/anywhere else than squaring off against someone who is armed to defend themselves, as was the case yesterday afternoon in Florida:

It happened in the 4800 block of Sawyer Pine Road in Sarasota at around 12:30p.m. this afternoon.

According to a release from the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office, the 15-year-old was home alone when he heard a person banging on the back door.

The teen saw the suspect at the back door attempting to break-in. The juvenile fired a shot with a shotgun in the area of the suspect and he fled the scene.

Incidents similar to this happen every day in the United States, and the two items that made this routine crime deterrence noteworthy are that a) a warning shot was fired, and b) the person who fired the warning shot was a teen. Typically, the mere presence of a firearm stops the crime, and it is typically adults that end up using firearms in self-defense.

This shotgun was used to stop a crime, without killing the criminal. Obviously, this firearm, like all firearms, was useful for something other than killing.

It gave a young man the ability to stop a crime and avoid being a victim.