Homeowner Linda Orist said that her tenant was forced to defend herself after the home invader refused to stop advancing upon her.
Homeowner Linda Orist said that her tenant was forced to defend herself after the home invader refused to stop advancing upon her.

A Colorado Springs woman who lives alone in a rented home is shaken up but fortunate to be alive after being forced to shoot and kill a home invader that wouldn’t stop advancing upon her, even after she fired a warning shot.

The criminal—which the media is referring to only as a burglar, despite there being no information suggesting that was the reason he was in the home of a woman living alone—first attempted to breach the back door. When he failed to break through the door, he then broke a window with a brick to enter the home.

That was his next to last mistake.

“She said she just heard some crashing, and got up and saw that this guy was climbing through her window,” said homeowner Linda Orist of her tenant.

Orist said her tenant was upset and shaken up but was relived she was OK.

“She was upset that she had to kill someone to protect herself,” said Orist.

Orist said the man initially tried to get in through the back door. When he was unsuccessful, Orist said he broke a window with a brick and tried to climb in.

“She warned him that she had a gun and to go away but he, I don’t know, for whatever reason, he kept coming, and she shot a warning shot into the wall and he kept coming so she had to shoot him twice,” said Orist.

There was absolutely no reason at all that the renter needed to fire a warning shot, and as we’ve noted repeatedly, warning shots are a horrible idea and are generally illegal (as a practical matter, you are either justified in using deadly force against an attacker or you are not; a warning shot is therefore often successfully prosecuted by anti-gun district attorneys as assault with a deadly weapon). Nonetheless, the home invader did keep coming after the warning shot, until the renter fired two more shots which finally persuaded him to attempt to flee.

Police responding to the 911 call found the man outside the home, and he was reported dead at the hospital.

The lawyer questioned for the story said that the renter might attempt to justify her case with the state’s so-called “make my day” law, which is a large steaming pile of bovine excrement.

OUR ADVICE: Never trust a lawyer in a hoodie.
OUR ADVICE: Never trust a lawyer in a hoodie.

This was a classic self-defense case under castle doctrine, which was the prevailing law in the English-speaking world since before the United States was even a country.

As a side note, never trust a defense attorney who does a television interview wearing a hoodie.