Two men walking in Philadelphia last night were attacked by a pair of robbers.

One of the two men who were the targets of the robbery was an armed concealed carry permit holder.

“Unbeknownst to the robbers, the 27-year-old victim has a permit to carry…has his handgun with him,” Police Lieutenant John Walker says. “He’s able to draw his handgun, firing multiple times, striking both robbery suspects.”

The concealed carrier’s friend was shot by one of the robbers during the exchange of shots, after the robber was shot.

All three men were rushed to an area hospital in critical condition. One of the robbers and the injured victim both died. The remaining robber remains in serious condition at the hospital.

At this time the incident is under investigation, and no charges have yet been filed against the surviving robber. No charges are expected against the concealed carrier.

The incident serves to show that while you can do everything absolutely right according to your training—the concealed carrier critically injured both robbers—you still can’t rely on a handgun to immediately end the threat without a central nervous system (CNS) strike, which is a small and well-protected target. A perfect controlled pair to the chest that strikes the heart and lungs still leaves enough oxygenated blood in an attacker’s brain to fight for 30 seconds or more, which is an eternity in a fight.

Ideally, you’ll have enough situational awareness and luck to avoid dangerous criminal threats.

In this incident, the concealed carrier seemed to do everything right, and still lost his companion to criminals.

The bright side—and it is indeed a clear bright side—is that one armed robber is in the grave and the other is likely to spend the rest of his life in prison if charged with two counts of murder and armed robbery. These two predators will never prey upon good people again.