While I love shooting different firearms, I admittedly stink at doing gun reviews.  Sure I shoot (most of) them well enough, and can form opinions both scientific and comparative, but it’s occasionally difficult for me to write about some of guns I get for review.

Some of the time it’s because I get a gun so mundane and “blah” that it’s simply impossible to get motivated enough to write about it.

And then there are times that you get something that is simply solid and definitely worth having, but you aren’t quite sure how to characterize it… and that’s the problem that I’ve had with Davidson’s Ruger 10/22 Takedown NRA Special Edition.

Davidson’s exclusive 10/22 Takedown NRA Special Edition .22LR Rifle

The Ruger 10/22 needs no introduction, as the handy semi-automatic .22LR rifle has been in continuous production since 1964, and there are more than 5 million of them in circulation. As an Appleseed instructor, I see 10/22s every time I hit the range because they are easy to run, easy to accessorize, fit most shooters, and are accurate.

Three years ago in 2012 Ruger added a 10/22 takedown model to their product lineup, and suddenly the light and handy carbine was even more utilitarian. It disassembled into two main sections (barrel and stock/action), which made it very easy to pack, and while it cost quite a bit more than the standard 10/22, it had a distinctive “cool factor.” Soon, they were showing up everywhere, and they quickly became a popular “go anywhere” utility rifle. Paired with Ruger’s 25-round BX-25 magazines, the rifle quickly became a favorite of many of preppers who wanted lightweight firepower with more range, magazine capacity, and practical accuracy than you were going to get in a pistol for their bug-out bags.

While great with the standard iron sights, many people have upgraded them with either Tech-Sights iron sights, red-dots, or have equipped them with a scope, like the Hawke Sport HD IR 3-9×40. With a 200-yard bullet-drop compensator, the Hawke turns the 10/22 Takedown into a great hunting and survival firearm.

The Davidson’s NRA special Edition of the builds off the standard 10/22 Takedown with great fiber-optic sights and a very useful Natural Gear camo pattern. While not marketed as aggressively as some other modern camouflage, the open pattern of Natural Gear disappears at a distance instead of appearing as a dark blob.

The NRA Special Edition also have a NRA logo on the bolt, and embroidered into the handsome carrying case.

Last but certainly not least, Davidson’s and Ruger are each donating $10 ($20 total) from every NRA Special Edition sold to the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action, the arm of the NRA that fights for your gun rights.

What’s not to love?

Frankly, while Davidson’s NRA Special Edition 10/22 Takedown may be of interest to collectors, I’m thinking that not this rifle as it was intended to be used is a shame. If I add one to my collection, it will indeed be a “truck gun” for sure.