Despite a mainstream media which slants coverage in order to drum up the illusion of widespread “gun violence,” 59-percent of Americans feel that the nation’s gun laws are either “about right” or “too strict.”

Only 41-percent of those polled want more strict gun control laws:

For the first time since its inception, a CNN/ORC poll finds that most Americans do not believe current gun laws make it “too easy” for Americans to buy guns.

When asked, “In your view, do existing laws make it too easy for people to buy guns, too difficult, or are they about right?”, 49 percent of respondents said “about right.”

Forty-one percent of respondents said current law made it “too easy” for people to buy guns and 10 percent said they made it “too difficult.” Only 1 percent of respondents had no opinion.

The poll has asked the question periodically since 1989. This is the first time that less than 56 percent of respondents have said guns are “too easy” to buy. In August 1993, 70 percent of respondents had answered guns were “too easy” to buy, the poll’s all-time high.

This polls represents a dramatic reversal in the nation’s attitudes about about firearms and the Second Amendment in recent years.

This shift made all the more remarkable by the fact that the mainstream media news media and entertainment media—who control so much of what we view and hear—are colluding with the left wing of the Democrat party to actively push the fictional narrative that “gun violence is an epidemic.”

Of course, “gun violence” is merely a buzzword.

Guns and violence are both tools, neither with any moral agency of their own.

In terms of the criminal use of violence (which is what we should actually be focused on), it has remained low as gun ownership has skyrocketed in recent years.

Cam Edwards, Colion Noir and I spoke about the widespread, demographic-jumping growth of gun culture (my segment runs from about 1:22:00 to about 1:40:00) on Cam & Company yesterday.

I got into firearms and shooting first as a hunter, and then as a “gun geek” because the technology fascinated me. I came into shooting through the very traditional “Gun Culture 1.0” tradition of gun ownership being passed down from a parent to a child.

Gun Culture 1.0 is the bedrock of the American tradition, but we’re seeing something truly amazing in the growth of what has been dubbed “Gun Culture 2.0” in recent years. This new gun culture includes many people who didn’t come from a traditional route, and includes people like Colion, who came into the firearms culture on their own or through friends.

Gun Culture 2.0 is a social phenomenon, and has shattered the image of gun owners as being just “old white conservative rural males.” While that cohort is still the largest demographic among gun owners and probably will be for some time, we’re increasingly seeing young, female, minority, and urban shooters flocking to the range.

The neatest thing about Gun Culture 2.0 is something Colion pointed out during our chat. While he came in as Gun Culture 2.0, when he eventually has children, he’ll then be joining and renewing that bedrock tradition of a parent handing down the culture to their children.  Gun Culture 1.0 is constantly being renewed, and is growing in a way that reflects the melting pot that makes America great.

Age, race, region, religion… all of those potential dividing lines melt away as you talk shooting tips, tactics, gear, fun, and liberty. It s about a shared passion.

I’m convinced that the spread of gun culture in all of it’s versions is the reason we’re seeing such a dramatic shift in this CNN/ORC poll since they first starting asking this question in 1989.

We are a country that is increasingly developing more respect for our gun culture.

Let’s keep up the fight, happy warriors.