This morning, thanks to a Facebook post by TWANGnBANG, I discovered that the AK Operator’s Union Local 4774 had their Facebook page unceremoniously deleted without comment or warning by the social media giant, a fact that AKOU noted on Instagram.

I emailed Facebook’s PR team with the following comment and question.

…It has come to our attention that the Facebook page for the AK Operator’s Union 4774 has been shut down, which they claim was without warning. I believe that this was their page.

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=656164651082484

“AKOU,” as it is known, is a firearms education and training site dedicated to variants of the Kalashnikov rifle. We’ve seen them review different versions of the carbine, test equipment, and offer training information. We’ve never observed them doing anything that comes close to violating the terms and conditions of Facebook as we understand them.

I’d like to what reason there was for taking down this educational site, and for targeting other firearms-related pages that we know how been shut down recently. I’d like to know which specific post put up by AKOU violated which specific Facebook rule…

Late this afternoon, Andrew Souvall of Facebook responded.

“As our team processes millions of reports each week, we occasionally make a mistake. In this case, we should not have removed this Page, and we apologize for that. It has been restored.”

I’m sure that I’m not the only person who brought this mistake to Facebook’s attention, but I may be one of the few who got a response from a representative of the company, and so I thought it might be worth sharing their explanation.

So what really happened?

Unfortunately, gun control supporters are totalitarians at heart. They hate the First Amendment rights of firearms-related content providers just as much as they hate the Second Amendment itself.

They hate freedom. Your freedom, to be precise.

They delight in reporting gun companies, Second Amendment news sites, and educational sites as being in violation of Facebook’s terms and conditions, and every once in a while, they’ll be able to achieve a temporary victory.

As long as we stand strong and help on another out, we should be able to to keep these victories temporary.

It would be nice, however, if those who continually and dishonestly report sites that have done nothing wrong would face consequences for their actions. If Facebook took such steps, I’m sure that they’d earn more than one “like.”