Law and Justice

An investigation into Alton Sterling’s past criminal record unveiled a disturbing reason he should never have been on that corner selling CDs in Baton Rouge, LA on July 5.

He should have still been in jail.

In a report dated May 29, 2009 the officer stated he was dispatched to the convenience store after receiving a complaint about a suspect “on the corner selling CDs” who had just pulled a gun on someone.

The officer said he spotted the suspect, later identified as Alton Sterling, carrying a crate of CDs when he arrived at the store.

The officer asked Sterling to put his hands on the hood of the patrol car and asked if Sterling had any weapons on him which Sterling did “not answer”. As the officer continued to pat him down, Sterling reached for something in his pocket.

The officer said Sterling suddenly spun around and the two began to struggle, sending both men to the ground, but was able to call for backup.

“While wrestling with this subject on the ground a black semi auto hand gun fell from this subject waist band at this time,” the report states.

An East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s deputy arrived and the two officers were eventually able to get Sterling into handcuffs. The report ends saying that “Sterling was then escorted to my unit where he continued to fight with officers.”

Sterling was charged with possession of marijuana, sound reproduction prohibited (bootleg CDs), illegal possession of a firearm with drugs, resisting an officer and illegal possession of a stolen firearm.

Déjà vu, right?

Sterling plead guilty to one count of illegal carrying of a weapon with a controlled dangerous substance and was sentenced to five years in prison on July 19, 2011 – which he served until he made parole on Dec. 5, 2013.

Of course, Alton Sterling was back on a Baton Rouge, LA corner armed with a gun and selling bootleg CDs less than five years later where he chose to fight police and meet his untimely death.

You want to blame someone for Sterling’s death? Blame the criminal justice system that let him out in the first place. Then start a movement calling for a complete overhaul of the criminal justice system. It’s beyond broken.