ebonyholm

Around 1 a.m. Saturday morning, a couple in Macomb, MI got into a fight. But what started out as a domestic disturbance quickly became deadly.

Ebony Byrom told her husband Hal Byrom, 44, to leave the house before their argument escalated to violence, and when Hal refused to leave, she called 911.

“I just want him to leave before it escalates,” she told the 911 operator.

A dispatch recording of her emergency call recorded her talking to her husband in the background: “No, you need to leave, I’m not leaving, I have a child here.”

Ebony also informed the dispatcher that there was a gun in the house. When the dispatcher asked if the gun was locked up, Ebony responded, “No, it is not.”

10 short seconds later, Ebony was shot 10 times by her husband, who then turned the gun on himself.

38-year-old Ebony died at the scene. Hal was transported to a local hospital, where he is expected to survive from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the neck.

“The dispatcher was getting information, putting it in the computer, then you heard shots, then you didn’t hear anything,” said Macomb County Sheriff Anthony Wickersham.

Ebony’s 16-year-old son, who was upstairs playing video games, heard the gunshots. He came downstairs and found both his mother and stepfather. That’s when Macomb County Sheriff Deputies received a call from the victim’s son.

“…he started to provide information and our deputies instructed him on what to do and how to get out of house safely,” Wickersham said.

Authorities plan to charge Hal Byrom with murder.

“He’s unable to talk at this time,” Wickersham said. “He’s going to be charged with murder and felony firearm. Our detectives are working with the court right now to swear to that warrant and get him arraigned at his hospital bed.”

We encourage everyone, woman or man, to walk away from an argument if they feel threatened. It may not be convenient to gather up your children and leave your home in the middle of the night, but it just may save your life. Many hotels and motels offer vouchers for victims of domestic abuse. You can also drive to your local police station – many of which have connections to local shelters and resources that can help.

On average, it takes a victim seven times to leave before they leave for good.