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Gun control.

It’s part of a national debate and passionate arguments for and against. It’s on presidential campaign platforms and bumper stickers. It’s what drives some Moms to Demand Answers and other moms to take action.

But the truth about gun control won’t be heard from a podium at a debate or read on the bumper of a Prius. The truth can only be found through the lens of common sense.

Perhaps that’s why there are so many people today who can’t see it.

Alan Korwin spoke passionately on TownHall about the subject, saying:

This is the great flaw with law. It doesn’t work. It gives you legal options after the action, and it deters good people, sometimes, but it doesn’t do much other good. Gun control deters no one intent on evil acts. Only some of us understand this unfortunately. If laws against armed bank robbery worked, we’d have no armed bank robbers, right?

Laws’ failures are legendary, monumental, self evident, and yet missed. If laws against committing jihadi atrocities worked, there would be no San Bernardino, no Brussels, no Paris, none of the names that are going to happen in the not-too-distant future. If only gun control worked.

The constantly vilified supposedly evil gun lobby (the NRA) fervently wishes those laws worked. Every one of their five million members wishes gun-control laws—the 20,000 we hear are already on the books—worked as advertised. There isn’t any criminal act you can commit with a firearm that isn’t already illegal. If only those laws did something to stop crime! We’d be safer, and the left wouldn’t be out there, all alone you might have noticed, pressing for still more laws to do what those laws aren’t doing.

The worst part—new gun laws being proposed don’t even confront crime. They don’t have to, because the crimes are already outlawed. But I repeat myself. The new laws make crimes out of things that aren’t crime—by banning legal activity Americans do every day. Look at gun-transfer laws, pitched as more background checks* for example, the current rallying cry of more-gun-law proponents.

It’s already illegal for criminals to transfer guns, buy guns, have guns, giveaway guns, get guns, anything. More background checks will increasingly burden the innocent, but it won’t disarm or stop criminals who are already armed. Enhanced enforcement and arrests will have that desired effect, but these aren’t proposed.

Armed criminals are armed now despite all the laws banning it already. You do understand that, don’t you? Such questions are mysteriously not posed to gun-control advocates by the media. Instead, reporters virtually cheerlead and campaign for new laws that will incrementally disarm or subarm the public.

The Daily Caller reports:

If you were to think of dangerous countries, El Salvador may seem like a surprise appearance on the list. However, when this country, with less than half the population of the Los Angeles metropolitan area (6.3 million to 13.1 million), manages to see 22 murders a day, it is arguably the most dangerous country in the world not currently wracked by war.

There’s been no mention in coverage of El Salvador’s crime wave about gun control. Probably because the laws there, in some aspects, are a gun-grabber’s dream. In 1999, El Salvador passed tough gun control legislation. Among provisions of the law were the requirement to get a license that has to be renewed every three years, private citizens can only buy one gun every two years, firearms are registered, and there is no constitutional protection of the right to keep and bear arms. The legislation has not had the effects that those who support strict gun laws in the United States would like to advertise.

According to GunPolicy.org, 1,863 people were killed in firearms-related incidents of all types the year that the new gun law was passed. A decade later, despite the law, the death toll was 3,042, or an average of 25 people over a three-day period. Today, the murder rate now averages almost one person per hour.

The report “Would Banning Firearms Reduce Murder and Suicide? A Review of International and Some Domestic Evidence” published in the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy also found the truth. The SmallGovTimes provided a summary of the report, which concluded:

The Harvard study attempts to answer the question of whether or not banning firearms would reduce murders and suicides.  Researchers looked at crime data from several European countries and found that countries with HIGHER gun ownership often had LOWER murder rates.

Russia, for example, enforces very strict gun control on its people, but its murder rate remains quite high.  In fact, the murder rate in Russia is four times higher than in the “gun-ridden” United States, cites the study.  ”Homicide results suggest that where guns are scarce other weapons are substituted in killings.”  In other words, the elimination of guns does not eliminate murder, and in the case of gun-controlled Russia, murder rates are quite high.

The study revealed several European countries with significant gun ownership, like Norway, Finland, Germany and France – had remarkably low murder rates.  Contrast that with Luxembourg, “where handguns are totally banned and ownership of any kind of gun is minimal, had a murder rate nine times higher than Germany in 2002.”

The study found no evidence to suggest that the availability of guns contributes to higher murder rates anywhere in the world.  ”Of course, it may be speculated that murder rates around the world would be higher if guns were more available. But there is simply no evidence to support this.”

Further, the report cited, “the determinants of murder and suicide are basic social, economic, and cultural factors, not the prevalence of some form of deadly mechanism.”  Meaning, it’s not guns that kill people.

People kill people.

We need to shoot down their ignorant rhetoric and arrogant disdain for gun owners dead in it’s tracks. Take aim with the fact that gun control is on the wrong side of history and far from the truth. We need to put the facts of gun control on full-auto and never let off the trigger.