Why Learning To Shoot Is Good For Children

170144639

It’s a terrible time to say this, right after a 9-year-old girl killed her instructor with an Uzi, but shooting guns can be great for kids.

Of course, there’s shooting and there’s shooting. Handing a loaded submachine gun to a small child is patently crazy. Sadly, Charles Vacca, the instructor in Arizona, both paid for that mistake with his life and inflicted on the unnamed girl a life sentence of horror and regret. Lest anybody think that the gun-owning and gun-rights communities are defending Vacca’s judgment, rest assured that they’re not. I watch the gun blogosphere as part of my work, and even the most hard-core gunnies are appalled and infuriated…

… Under proper instruction, shooting is a ritual. You do this for this reason and that for that reason, and you never, ever alter the process, because doing so is a matter of life and death. Learning to slow down and go through such essential steps can be valuable developmentally. The very danger involved gets children’s attention, as it would anybody’s. But there’s an added benefit to teaching children to shoot: it’s a gesture of respect for a group that doesn’t often get any.

Invite a child to learn how to shoot and the message is: I trust your ability to listen and learn. I trust your ability to concentrate. I welcome you into a dangerous adult activity because you are sensible and trustworthy. For young people accustomed to being constrained, belittled, ignored and told “no,” hearing an adult call them to their higher selves can be enormously empowering. Children come away from properly conducted shooting lessons as different people, taller in their shoes and more willing to tune into what adults say.

I implore you to read the rest of Dan Baum’s Letting Kids Shoot Guns Is Good for Them, which surprisingly appears at Time.

Frankly, his comments make sense.

The most mature, respectful, calm, and peaceful young people I know are all shooters. Most of them are also devoutly religious, but some are not.

I’ve watched several grow into being incredibly well-centered young adults who have gone off to college, and they have maintained their discipline where so many of their peers have run off the rails and flunked out of school, having run wild without direct adult supervision for the first time in their lives. These young shooters, having learn discipline on the firing line from an early age, have the maturity and character than most non-shooters do not.

Thomas Jefferson’s sage advice was never more applicable than it is now.

In 1785 Thomas Jefferson wrote to his fifteen-year-old nephew, Peter Carr, regarding what he considered the best form of exercise: “…I advise the gun. While this gives a moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprize, and independance to the mind. Games played with the ball and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be the constant companion of your walks.”

(h/t The Gun Wire)

Tags: ,

5 Comments

Leave a Reply