Maryland Considers Bill To Confiscate Guns From 110,000 Registered Gun Owners

Maryland is considering a law that would link the state’s gun ownership registry with the criminal registry, creating a confiscation list affecting approximately 110,000 individuals:

More than 100,000 individuals in Maryland could become disqualified from owning their registered gun under a bill currently under consideration by state lawmakers.

According to the Associated Press, the Maryland House of Delegates is debating a proposal that would link the state’s gun and criminal registries, enabling law enforcement officials to more effectively seize firearms in the possession of those convicted of felonies or violent crimes.

Under Maryland law, anyone convicted of such crimes is required to relinquish their firearms. However, the chief sponsor of the proposed bill, Delegate Luiz Simmons (D-Montgomery Couny), said the law is incapable of truly being enforced if police cannot use their database to pinpoint the individuals in question.

If passed into law, the new bill would require police to run a check twice a year in search of convicted felons with registered guns. Police, meanwhile, believe the linked systems would lead them to disqualify 10 percent of registered gun owners. That amounts to approximately 110,000 people.

10-percent of your registered gun owners are felons, Maryland? Really?

At the same time they are mulling this confiscation bill, anti-gun Democrats are attempting to move forward another bill that will stall firearm sales until background checks are complete, however long that takes.

Under federal law and existing state law, authorities have a week to complete a background check, and if they don’t disqualify a purchaser, the dealer can complete the sale. Maryland is attempting to create a situation where they can refuse to hire additional staff—or even shrink current staff—conducting background checks, slowing transfers down to weeks or even months.

You think that can’t and won’t happen? Try to register an item affected by the National Firearms Act with the ATF. The current wait time on most NFA items now is stretched out beyond nine months. It’s currently easier to manufacture a human being than register a suppressor for legal transfer with ATF.

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