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Nevada’s so-called “universal” (except for criminals) background check scheme is dead on arrival.

The expansion of gun background checks approved by Nevada voters last month will not happen as expected, based on an opinion released Wednesday by the Nevada Attorney General’s Office.

Ballot Question 1 requires that private party gun transfers – with a few exceptions – be subject to a federal background check through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System administered by the FBI.

The FBI sent a letter Dec. 14 to the state of Nevada’s Department of Public Safety saying it would not conduct these checks. The department asked for a legal opinion on the letter’s ramifications.

Because the text of the new Background Check Act says private-party transfers and sales must be done through the FBI background check system, the Nevada Attorney General’s Office opinion states, “citizens may not be prosecuted for their inability to comply with the Act unless and until the FBI changes its public position and agrees to conduct the background checks consistent with the Act.”

The FBI gave several reasons why it would not conduct the check. The main reason is that “the recent passage of the Nevada legislation regarding background checks for private sales cannot dictate how federal resources are applied.”

In other words, it would require additional staffing or resources at the FBI to handle the additional work arising from Nevada’s expansion of background checks.

Like good little liberals everywhere, Nevada’s anti-gun Democrats expected someone else (in this case, the federal government in the form of the FBI) to foot the bill for their edict.

The feds have rejected it outright.

Nevada Attorney General Adam Paul Laxalt has noted it is entirely unenforceable (PDF).

Mike Bloomberg is out the $20 million or so he spent pushing this faulty referendum into being.

I guess hiring a rookie lawyer to see if the law was implementable never crossed his mind.