Mark and Patricia McCloskey may be facing felony charges for displaying firearms on their own property while an angry mob busted down a gate leading into their private community as they marched to Mayor Lyda Krewson’s home, but what are the chances that the pair will actually end up in a trial over the events that unfolded in the early evening hours of June 28th?

Marina Medvin, senior columnist at Townhall.com and a trial attorney, joins me on today’s Bearing Arms’ Cam & Co. to talk about the politically charged decision to pursue a case against the McCloskeys, and why she believes the couple will soon be in the clear.

Medvin says that the intervention by Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, who’s filed a brief to intervene in the case and dismiss the charges against the St. Louis couple, should be enough to put a halt to the prosecution. Schmitt argues that the McCloskeys had every right to protect themselves and their property from the mob, telling Fox News:

“The right to keep and bear arms is given the highest level of protection in our constitution and our laws, including the Castle Doctrine, which provides broad rights to Missourians who are protecting their property and lives from those who wish to do them harm…

“Despite this, Circuit Attorney Gardner filed suit against the McCloskeys, who, according to published reports, were defending their property and safety. As Missouri’s Chief law enforcement officer, I won’t stand by while Missouri law is being ignored,” Schmitt said.

If for some reason Schmitt’s request to intervene and dismiss the case is rejected by the circuit court judge, Missouri Gov. Brad Parson has already repeatedly stated that he’ll pardon Mark and Patricia McCloskey, most recently on Monday night’s edition of Sean Hannity’s show.

“Without a doubt, Sean,” he said when asked about a pardon. “I will do everything within the Constitution of the State of Missouri to protect law-abiding citizens and those people are exactly that. They are law-abiding citizens, and they’re being attacked frankly by a political process that’s really unfortunate.”

Prosecutor Kim Gardner, meanwhilem says she’s willing to offer the McCloskeys a chance at pre-trial diversion, meaning the couple wouldn’t face any jail time and could have their record expunged. Why even bother with charges at this point, other than to make some headlines and earn some far-Left street cred in the days before the St. Louis Democratic primary, where Gardner will face off against several challengers in her bid to retain her seat.

Medvin notes that Gardner has already received more than $75,000 from George Soros as part of the billionaire’s campaign to “quietly overhaul” the nation’s criminal justice system by electing radically far-Left prosecutors around the country. Back in 2016, Gardner’s campaign accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars from a Soros-funded super PAC and easily outspent her opponents to win the Democratic nod, which in Democrat-dominated St. Louis virtually guarantees victory in the general election.

The prosecution of the McCloskeys is an argument for criminal justice reform, not an example of it in action, but for Gardner, it’s clearly an opportunity to raise her national profile all while claiming she’s seeking “equal justice,” whatever that is. At the end of the day, I agree with Medvin that the McCloskeys won’t ever face a trial in a court of law, but Gardner will do everything she can to convict them in the court of public opinion.