California has some of the most restrictive gun control laws of any state in the nation, but that doesn’t mean that they’re always enforced. The rapper known as Blueface, for instance, recently dodged a felony gun charge by pleading down to a misdemeanor in a case involving a shooting in Newhall, California. As KHTS reported:

Jonathan Porter, also known by his rap pseudonym Blueface, pled no contest on Dec. 27 to one misdemeanor count of carrying a loaded firearm on one’s person or in a vehicle, according to Ricardo Santiago, spokesperson for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.

Porter was sentenced to 36 months summary probation and eight days of community service, as well as ordered to pay restitution, fines and fees, according to Santiago.

Blueface was arrested in November 2018 after the Newhall shooting, which ended with the vehicle carrying Porter crashing into the center divider on the 14 Freeway, according to Shirley Miller, spokesperson for the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station.

“Under the course of the investigation, detectives found evidence of a robbery prior to the shooting incident,” Miller said at the time.

Porter was released on a $50,000 bond for assault with a deadly weapon charges, Miller said.

This isn’t Porter’s first run-in with the law, either. As Revolt pointed out:

Earlier this year, he was arrested and charged with felony possession of a loaded firearm, before being released on $35,000 bail.

TMZ reports that the 22-year-old is currently embroiled in another legal scandal, this one stemming from his camp. Law enforcement sources told the outlet that the Los Angeles Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the rapper’s team following a brawl at a Los Angeles nightclub.

I have no doubt that Porter will be offered a plea deal for the felony gun possession charge as well.

Meanwhile, the state of California is making life a little harder for legal gun owners, even as guys like Porter avoid real consequences for their crimes. Several new laws are taking effect in the state as of January 1st. CBS8 in San Diego has a rundown.

AB 12- This law extends the amount of time before a person can buy a gun to five years, if they have a gun violence restraining order placed against them.

AB 1968- Prohibits a person from owning a gun for life if they’ve been admitted into a health facility more than once within a one-year.

SB 61- The law that prohibits people from purchasing more than a handgun a month would be extended to those who want to buy a long gun as well. The law would also restrict people under the age of 21 from buying a gun.

Apparently if you’re a hip-hop star or have any sort of celebrity status, these new laws may not apply to you. For every other California gun owner, however, the new laws are just a further erosion of your right to keep and bear arms.