moshe_kasher

“Who cares what this idiot says?” I can hear our readers comment.

Well, that in and of itself is, well… problematic.

Moshe Kasher, an observational comedian, writer and self-deprecating former drug addict and criminal, is hosting a new show on Comedy Central called “Problematic”. The show, which debuted Tuesday, “promises to pull the country out of digital echo chambers and information bubbles and into an actual discussion.” …or at least that’s what the show’s press release claims.

Comedy Central announced the show will serve it’s viewers a healthy stew of social issues:

Each episode of Problematic will delve into a single topic of online outrage – such as impeachment, the dark web, cultural appropriation, ideological changes of heart, the liberal case for guns, and more – and examine how it shapes our culture. With the help of experts, comedians, and questions from both the in-studio and online audience, Kasher will solve every problem that has ever existed by the end of the episode, bringing peace and harmony to the internet once and for all while paving the way for a Oprah/Schwarzenegger co-presidency in 2020.

Why does this matter? Well, Comedy Central Viewers don’t typically hit the library for dessert. They tend to digest spoon-fed information from anyone on a shiny platform, (Beyonce, Mark Ruffalo, Katy Perry, Meryl Streep, Tomi Lahren, Chris Matthews) regardless if the message is healthy or toxic.

In a recent interview with the AV Club, Kasher shared insight into his feelings toward guns:

“…that’s the perfect example of an issue that I don’t necessarily agree with the premise of, and yet I see that there is an argument for … I don’t like guns personally. I’ve looked into them. They’re not for me. They make me very uncomfortable. But I also recognize that there is a counterargument to the gun control argument that isn’t just a bunch of stupid, murderous, wild people going, “Give me my guns!” There’s a deeper conversation to be had there, and just because I happen to know where I fall into that conversation doesn’t mean that I don’t want to have that conversation.”

It’s lovely that he ‘recognizes there is a counterargument to gun control’, but can anyone who tweets like Kasher truly be an impartial moderator in a discussion on guns?

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I’m thinking not.

The bottom line? It’s up to us to not only police the narrative assaulting the earholes of millennials and upcoming voters but to counter their ignorant rhetoric with a swift and respectful fact-based response.

If we don’t speak up and work to knock down these tall tales, they’ll eventually stack up – leaving us on the outside of a strong hold on our gun rights.