protest

As previously reported by KVUE, radio host and gun rights advocate Michael Cargill was an unintended witness to protests last weekend over “raids” performed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

While driving through Austin, Texas, Saturday night, Cargill pulled out his phone and documented some “intense moments,” calling these protests out as a problem. Cargill attributes the violence as a result of Councilman Greg Casar and his rhetoric.

Councilman Greg Casar has been very vocal about his stance against ICE and their obligation to enforce the law with regard to non-American citizens who are here illegally. Cargill feels Casar’s stance incited the criminal behavior, turning what should have been a peaceful demonstration into chaos.

Councilman Casar took to his Facebook page earlier this week after the chaotic protests and urged his constituents to continue protesting, peacefully; completely side-stepping acknowledgement of any criminal behavior from the previous night.

Michael Cargill wants the public to know that your right to protest means (via KVUE):

“You’re not destroying private property. You’re not destroying businesses, you’re not throwing things at cars.” The radio host went on to say when violence takes over, the message is lost. “That is something city council member Greg Casar has condoned,” Cargill said. “And that is something that cannot be put up with in this country, in Austin, Texas — not in this state.”

Addressing the fact that people are upset, scared, and angry it is duly noted. But why is there such an uproar in protests now; specifically those that turn into violent discourse?

During the third presidential debate on October 19th, 2016, then candidate Donald Trump said, “Nobody knows about it, nobody talks about it, but under Obama, millions of people have been moved out of this country, they’ve been deported.”

He was right so-to-speak; the citizens were not protesting loudly about it, but to be fair it had been reported. The legacy on Obama’s immigration policies speak for themselves, approximately 2.4 million people were deported under Obama’s presidency. These figures garnered Obama the title “Deporter-in-Chief”.

According to the Department of Homeland Security, Operation “Cross Check” is an operation led yearly since May 2011 by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). This operation sweeps the nation targeting the apprehension and removal/deportation of convicted criminal non-American citizens.

In fiscal year 2014 alone, 315,943 individuals from the United States were removed. ICE enforcement priorities include removable aliens considered threats to national security, those attempting to unlawfully enter the United States, gang members, felons, and individuals convicted of crimes including domestic violence, sexual abuse, drug distribution or driving under the influence.

The current situation that has outraged Michael Cargill in Austin is occurring due to misinformation, as reported by KXAN, who clarifies:

ICE maintains the enforcement operations of the past week are part of routine efforts by the agency, planned before the president’s executive orders on immigration. “ICE does not conduct sweeps, checkpoints or raids that target aliens indiscriminately,” the agency said.

These actions have instilled fear among Americans and non-Americans.

Sen. Dawn Buckingham, R-Austin, says the source of the fear is “misinformation.”

It’s unfortunate that so many people want to propagate misinformation. Those folks are probably responding to some of that misinformation. The truth is ICE goes off of leads and doesn’t do random sweeps. If we could keep the propagation of information to actually verifiable facts, then people would realize they don’t have anything to be afraid of.

And to Mr. Cargill’s point, if the protesters actually knew the facts regarding what they are protesting, either they will realize they should have started their peaceful protests years ago, or maybe they should just sit this one out; either way, inciting violence has no place in today’s society.