One of the anti-gunners latest loves is the idea of raising the age required to purchase a firearm to 21. They somehow think this will dissuade mass shootings for some ridiculous reason. While this law won’t impact many of us, Second Amendment advocates reject it because it interferes with the right of legal adults to keep and bear arms for sport or personal defense.

Unfortunately, these laws seem to be getting a fair bit of traction. Even the supposed “Gunshine State” passed such a law.

However, the state of Louisana showed some sense that Florida lacked.

A measure to put many popular semi-auto firearms out of the reach of those 18-to-20 in Louisiana was easily defeated Tuesday in the state Senate.

The bill, SB 274, failed to pass, gaining just nine “yes” votes in the chamber against 26 lawmakers who were opposed. Sponsored by state Sen. Troy Carter, D-New Orleans, it would put many guns off-limits to a segment of adults in the state based on age.

“We need to do something to make our classrooms safer,” Carter said.

Carter’s bill classifies an “assault weapon” to include any pistol or rifle with a fixed magazine that can accept more than 10 rounds, any shotgun with a detachable magazine or revolving cylinder, and almost any gun with a combination of features such as a detachable magazine and barrel shroud or threaded barrel. Under his proposal, such firearms could only be transferred to those 21 or older.

There are a couple of facts that Sen. Carter needs to keep in mind.

One, our classrooms actually are safe. Shootings like Parkland are extraordinarily rare. They’re horrifying when they happen, but they’re far from common occurrences. The odds of a student being involved in such an incident is 1 in 614,000,000…in 1999, when these were happening with far more regularity. The odds of being struck by lightning are only 1 in 700,000. The odds are greater of someone being killed by a meteorite hitting them (1 in 1,600,000).

In other words, let’s stop pretending that this is something that happens all the time and is some kind of epidemic. It’s not. There’s a better chance of winning the lottery than there is of being killed in a school shooting.

Our classrooms are safe. What isn’t safe are our Second Amendment rights because anti-gun politicians trying to make a name for themselves take these unusual events and craft policy around them.

Louisiana made the right call in rejecting this nonsense. More states need to follow suit.

When we make laws, they need to have a high likelihood of making a positive difference for people. Just on the surface, we can tell that this nonsense won’t, especially since they were created to solve a problem that is high profile but actually pretty unusual. As a result, millions may be barred from purchasing a weapon for personal defense, but school shootings will happen with about the same regularity as they have been.

But it’s never really been about making people safer. It’s about making lawmakers feel warm and tingly and little else.