Have you ever been pulled over by police and noticed they seemed a little tense? I mean, you were speeding or whatever. You’re not running drugs or anything, so why are they so tense?

Well, probably because traffic stops are often one of the most dangerous things police officers do on a daily basis, and that’s not to imply that they don’t deal with other dangerous situations.

While most traffic stops aren’t a big deal, they can turn dangerous in no time at all. Take this video of a November 7, 2017 traffic stop in Pennsylvania.

Warning: Some of this content is pretty violent and explicit.

The driver, Daniel Clary, was convicted of two counts of attempted murder for trying to kill Trooper Ryan Seiple, and Cpl. Seth Kelly as well as resisting arrest, escape, and disarming police on June 29.

It seems that it was only through great medical science and divine intervention that Clary wasn’t convicted of murder.

Kelly was seriously wounded when Clary opened fire from the driver’s side of his vehicle — he was shot in the neck and the leg, suffering a punctured femoral artery. Prosecutors say he was clinically dead at the scene and spent nearly two weeks in a coma.

He has since recovered and expects to return to work. The other officer, Seiple, was unharmed. Clary was shot four times, and surrendered after seeking medical care at a nearby hospital.

I can’t tell you how glad I am to know that Kelly will return to work. A lot of people think leg shots aren’t dangerous, but they are. In fact, it sounds like Kelly’s leg wound was more life-threatening than his neck wound.

Folks, this is why that officer who pulled you over is so tense. This kind of thing can happen, and it’s not like the police get to pick when it will. If you’re pulled over, make sure the officer can see your hands. While they’re still back in their car, get your license, registration, and proof of insurance handy–assuming your state requires all three on your person–and have it visible as they approach the car.

That will go a long way in making sure the officer is comfortable and might make things a bit more pleasant. I’ve also found that if you know you’re speeding, a simple, “Sorry about that, officer” goes a long way to smooth things over and helps them feel a bit more at ease.

Additionally, don’t be a drunk driving, violent jackwagon like Clary. That’ll help a whole lot as well.

I’m just saying.

I’m glad the officers are good to go and that Clary is going away for a long, long time. While he hasn’t been sentenced just yet, I seriously doubt his litany of crimes will get him just a couple of years and a pat on the head. He’ll be gone for a while, and why? Because he didn’t want to go to jail for drunk driving?

Tell me, Mr. Clary, how did that work out for you?