If there’s one thing the American left loves more than gun control, it’s identity politics. They love to put people in little boxes and expect them to vote a certain way because of they’re ethnicity. They don’t like to think of people as individuals who make decisions about their politics based on their own experiences, observations, and understanding. That’s why they get so angry at black Republicans, for example.

Yet they can’t help themselves. They don’t see how someone can’t identify with the identity group in every way, which may explain an op-ed that’s trying to push Jewish Republicans to embrace gun control in the wake of the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting.

Jewish Republicans, your brethren have a critical assignment for you – pressure your fellow Republicans to establish strong gun control measures.

Advocates have long professed that gun control legislation is required to keep firearms out of reach of these assassins. New laws might not prevent all these incidents, but it will likely thwart a great many of them. These measures will not take firearms away from responsible gun owners.

Only Congress can accomplish this, and most Republicans have repeatedly refused to vote for such laws.

That’s where you, Jewish Republicans, enter the picture. The pro-Israel community and the firearms lobby are known as the top two funders of political campaigns. Republican members of Congress and presidential candidates rely on both lobbies.

Jewish Republicans are hardly monolithic about firearms. The Republican Jewish Coalition makes that clear as part of its mission statement:

“Social issues such as abortion, gay rights, gun control…are topics that generate strong emotions on all sides. The RJC membership and Board of Directors are as divided as the rest of America on these issues. The RJC recognizes that many good people hold opposing views on these matters and we respect the differences of opinion among our membership.”

That statement affords Jews in the GOP a foundation for applying their influence with and access to the President and Republicans in Congress.

Honestly, this disgusts me.

Jewish Republicans who oppose gun control oppose it based on a number of issues, including the fact that the Constitution of the United States of America clearly says that the right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. Others recognize that gun control doesn’t work to thwart these attacks. At most, they transform the attacks, as killers use different tools and they successfully disarm the only people who might have had a chance to stop it.

A far better use of everyone’s time would be to combat the anti-semitism that was the driving force behind Saturday’s attack. That’s something we can universally agree has no place in our world today. Where are the calls for bipartisan efforts to combat that?

Of course, that doesn’t serve the leftist narrative, the very same narrative that routinely opposes any effort to support Israel. The same narrative that seems focused on supporting Israel’s enemies, enemies that want to see the Jewish state destroyed.

The writer here is nothing more than an identitarian who seems to believe that his politics should be the politics of the entire Jewish population. He expects Jews to stay on the leftist plantation, and when they get uppity and go off, he’ll use anything he can to get them back on.

That includes blaming guns for the actions of a hateful maniac, apparently, rather than the hateful maniac in question.