When I was a kid, my father took me to my first gun show. I remember seeing all the assortment of guns and decided I wanted to collect firearms. I wanted a whole lot of them because they’re fascinating devices. Their functions not only interest me, but the aesthetics of them are intriguing as well.

In short, I want all the guns.

Unfortunately, I live in a world where the word “survivor” seems to convey some special status on people, which matters because one such survivor thinks there should be limits on the total number of guns owned by anyone.

A Las Vegas Strip shooting survivor says despite the fact the FBI found no specific motive by the gunman, he shouldn’t have have been able to stockpile the weapons he used to kill 58 people and injure almost 900.

Stephanie Dobyns Welleck of San Francisco reacted to an FBI final report on Tuesday, saying there should be limits on the number of guns that one person should own.

Police reported finding 23 rifles and a handgun in the Mandalay Bay hotel rooms from which [the killer] fired into a concert crowd in October 2017.

Twenty-five more weapons were found in [his] homes in Reno and Mesquite, Nevada.

I get that Welleck went through something traumatic. I understand that had an impact on her thinking, especially about guns, gun rights, and gun control.

But it’s also important for Welleck to know that her thinking, such as it is, is faulty.

Yes, the killer had a whole lot of guns in his hotel room based on what we have learned from the police. However, it doesn’t take a “stockpile” of firearms to commit mass carnage. The Orlando nightclub shooter killed 50 people, just nine fewer than the Las Vegas shooter, with only a rifle and handgun. The Virginia Tech shooter killed 33 people with two handguns. The Sandy Hook killer committed his atrocities with a rifle and a pistol. The Sutherland Springs killer just used his rifle.

The truth is, most people who commit these crimes aren’t gun people. In other words, they’re not the type to be into buying a lot of guns. Instead, they buy what they need to commit these horrific acts.

The Las Vegas killer was an anomaly. But the FBI report indicates that he was trying to live up to some image he had of his bank robber father. When you live in a world where the media presents guns as being tools of bad people, is it any surprise that a bad person buys a lot of firearms?

Yet that’s precisely one example of someone with a large number of firearms who has committed anything like this. Why in the world should we punish others because of that one person’s actions?

That’s not how this nation works.

Further, the logistics of how such a thing would work are something Welleck hasn’t considered. For one, how many guns do people have now? The only way to enforce any limit is to register firearms to know how many people have right now, thus keeping them from going over the cap. Welleck is deluding herself if she thinks we’ll all rush out to register our guns because the government said so. Sorry, but it isn’t happening. Look at how well it’s worked in states that have tried it. In other words, it hasn’t.

Welleck was traumatized by something that I can’t even imagine, but that doesn’t mean she knows what she’s talking about.