AP Photo/Thomas Hartwell

When I was a kid, if you wanted to give me a toy I’d be sure to love, you made sure it was gun shaped. That was all you really needed. I had a toy arsenal that would make Ian from Forgotten Weapons jealous.

Frankly, so did my friends.

We stormed the beaches of Normandy and Iwo Jima. We braved the jungles of Viet Nam. We fought Soviets like in Red Dawn. At least, we did in our imaginations.

Oddly enough, not a single one of us grew up to be a mass shooter, murderer, or violent thug. Imagine that.

But the folks at In Touch Weekly need to get in touch with their selves. It seems they’re kvetching about “Teen Mom 2” star Jenelle Evans allowing her kids to play with toy guns.

Raising them right or nah? Teen Mom 2 star Jenelle Evans hasn’t had the best parenting moments over the years and fans are always waiting for her next slip up. On Saturday, March 9, the 27-year-old took to Instagram to share a couple of snaps from her family’s weekend shenanigans — which included some toy gun play for her youngest children, Kaiser, 4, and Ensley, 2.

Evans and her husband have a history of supporting the Second Amendment, though not always in the most…sensitive of ways.

After all, the publication was quick to point out that Evans shared a picture of herself holding a rifle right after Parkland last year, which was a social faux pa. However, it’s also worth remembering that her gun had nothing to do with Parkland, so what was the big deal?

Oh, yeah, that’s right. Evans forgot that gun rights advocates are required to wait a respectful amount of time after a mass shooting while the gun grabbers can go nuts screaming about how we need gun control, all before we even know what the hell happened.

The truth is, places like In Touch Weekly don’t want anyone famous to touch a firearm. They want anyone classified as a celebrity to be as vehemently anti-gun as they most likely are, and Evans doesn’t play by that set of rules.

Undoubtedly, some are going to point out that she was on a show called “Teen Mom 2” because she didn’t always make the best decisions, but I’d remind them that as high school kids, few of us did. At this point, she’s 27-years-old. To say she’s not the same person would be an understatement.

Look, I’m personally glad to see kids still playing with toy guns. It’s a big chunk of how my father taught me firearm safety growing up. It’s the reason I’ve gotten toy guns for both my son when he was younger, as well as my daughter. They learn with the toy guns, so they understand it well before getting to the real ones.

Any claims that playing with them leads to violence later in life is bogus. After all, there are far more examples of people who didn’t become violent after such a childhood than those who did.