While some anti-gunners try very hard to pretend that guns aren’t a partisan issue, the truth is that it sort of is. While we can find a handful of pro-gun Democrats and a few Republicans who may express anti-gun views, the lines are pretty clearly drawn right between the parties.

Which makes it interesting whenever someone from one party even suggests entertaining gun arguments from the other side.

Representative Ted Davis Jr. is weighing in on the gun control debate that has been taking place from the national to the local level. Several gun control bills have been presented to state lawmakers, but for Davis, individual bills will do little to curb the bigger problem.

“As the Senior Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, I have previously stated that rather than dealing with various gun Bills that are presently pending in that Committee that might offer a partial solution to gun violence, there needs to be comprehensive reform that reviews and addresses the status of our current mental health services, social and criminal justice reforms, and existing gun laws. Addressing one symptom while not addressing all of the causes will do little to avert a future tragedy,” Davis wrote in a newsletter.

But a current bill in the General Assembly, House Bill 86, would add significant restrictions to purchasing any type of firearm.

“I previously met with Becky Ceartas, Executive Director of North Carolinians Against Gun Violence, to discuss potential legislation. Our discussion included Extreme Risk Protection Orders (Red Flag Laws) in general; House Bill 86, “Gun Violence Prevention Act”; and mental health issues,” Davis said.

HB 86 would completely shake up the current status quo when it comes to purchasing long guns (rifles, shotguns) and require a permit to purchase any such weapon. Currently, an individual wanting to buy a long gun simply has to pass a background check on the federal level. Once that check is complete, a customer could leave the store in under an hour with a rifle or shotgun.

The proposed legislation would also require a 72 hour waiting period before a customer could take ownership of a long gun.

Now, it’s possible that Davis was simply responding to a question and his quotes are being placed out of context. The story does note that he didn’t express opinions one way or the other on the bill.

However, I’m skeptical, and I urge any of his constituents reading this to reach out and demand answers from him. After all, if he opposes the legislation, why not say so?

The truth is, North Carolina has some archaic rules that need to die anyway. In particular, they require people to get a pistol purchase permit before they can buy a handgun. That’s then coupled with a concealed carry permit should someone wish to carry a firearm in public.

HB 86 would expand that to any firearm. In other words, you’d be required to ask the state for permission prior to exercising your Second Amendment rights. That’s intolerable and I sincerely urge North Carolinians to reach out and make sure HB 86 dies a horrible death and doesn’t become law.

Then, maybe, activists can get the pistol purchase permit law legislated out of existence.