The state of Virginia isn’t what it once was. It’s now becoming less of a state that respects the rights of people and more of a cautionary tale for what happens when anti-gunners take power.

It’s no wonder why so many states jumped to join the Second Amendment sanctuary movement.

The problem is, most people understand that saying you won’t enforce a particular law or set of laws just isn’t enough. Those laws are still enforceable by state police, for one thing, and it’s still a case of the government trying to infringe on your sacred and inalienable rights.

So what should Virginia counties do?

There have been some terrible arguments made against sanctuary counties, but few have noted that sanctuary status is, at best, a shield rather than a full set of armor.

Enter West Virginia. The state split off from Virginia during the Civil War, and now their governor is suggesting other counties break off and join them.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice and Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. are urging unhappy Virginia counties to secede and join a neighboring state where Democrats aren’t in charge.

Their invitation Tuesday to join West Virginia added weight to a backlash against Virginia Democrats’ push for gun control.

Justice and Falwell both acknowledged that it was probably a longshot, but should it be?

Honestly, I haven’t delved into what it would take for counties to jump ship and join West Virginia, but I do think it’s something a lot of Virginian counties should take a long, hard look at.

If the state of Virginia isn’t interested in respecting your rights, then maybe it’s time to join a state that actually will.

This concept isn’t exactly new. I’ve written about movements to break Washington and Illinois into two states, for example, and a lot of the motivation for that is because of how small urban centers completely ignore the rights and needs of the more rural parts of the state on things like guns.

What we’re talking about in Virginia is very similar…except we’re talking about them moving from one state to another.

Yet I can’t help but believe that if you’re stuck with a state that is going to ignore the will of 90 percent of the counties in order to cater to the D.C. suburbs, then maybe it’s time to at least consider West Virginia’s offer.

Look, if you had a friend in a souring relationship where his or her partner clearly didn’t care about what they had to say, would you advise them to stick it out? Or would you tell them to leave?

How is this really any different?

Sure, there’s an election next year that might change a whole lot about the state, but it also might not. Especially as Democrats are doing everything they can to revamp elections in the state in a blatant attempt to hold power indefinitely. With all that in mind, it’s time to start looking at your options.

The best, most viable option might be to join West Virginia.

At least then you have a chance that your rights will be respected.