Grandmother's Experience Illustrates Importance Of Guns

AP Photo/Wilson Ring

One reason some people say we don’t need guns is that we have the police. For the sake of argument, let’s assume this person is self-aware enough to not also call for defunding the police.

In these people’s minds, you don’t need a firearm, you just call the police and they’ll swoop in to protect you.

Unfortunately for them, though, the courts have routinely found that the police don’t actually have a duty to protect you. They can and do protect people all the time, but they’re not obligated to do any such thing. Counting on it might not be the wisest course of action.

And even if you take that out of the picture, they still have to get there in time to do anything. That’s a fact reinforced by a San Antonio grandmother’s recent experience.

Protecting your family, especially young children can be one of the most important things we do as adults. An alleged attempted burglary left a San Antonio grandmother helpless, hunkered down with her young grandson, waiting for more than an hour for police to respond.

Now she is wondering if there is anything she could have done to get the police to her home sooner.

Dr. Joann Murphey was washing dishes just before 10 pm on July 16th when two unknown men walked into her gated yard and into her courtyard. One of them knocked on a window. His face was only 3 feet away from hers – only separated by glass.

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Protecting your family, especially young children can be one of the most important things we do as adults. An alleged attempted burglary left a San Antonio grandmother helpless, hunkered down with her young grandson, waiting for more than an hour for police to respond.

Now she is wondering if there is anything she could have done to get the police to her home sooner.

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Grandmother hunkers down with gun waiting for SAPD(SBG San Antonio)

Dr. Joann Murphey was washing dishes just before 10 pm on July 16th when two unknown men walked into her gated yard and into her courtyard. One of them knocked on a window. His face was only 3 feet away from hers – only separated by glass.

“I asked him to leave. He refused. I told him I was calling the police. He threw up his hands and said, ‘I’m coming in.’”

At this point, Murphey ran towards her room, the whole time the two men could see her every move, her house is all windows looking into that enclosed courtyard.

“I turned off all the lights, went to my bedroom, closed the blinds because you also can see in my bedroom from where he was, and called 911,” says Murphey.

“When you called 911 to the time they showed up. The officer showed up, how long was that?” Yami asked. “An excess of an hour, maybe an hour and 15 minutes. I can’t tell you specifically, but over an hour,” says Murphey.

Now, I’m going to ask you to do something that may make you a little uncomfortable. I’m going to ask you to think of all the horrible things you can do to a person in less than an hour.

Even if you don’t kill them, there are still so many vicious things a human being can do to another, and many of them can be done in far less than an hour.

Murphey called the police, just like people say you should do. Then she had to wait and hope the police show up.

Me and a lot of people like me? We’ll call the police and hunker down, but if they come in anyway, they’re going to have a very bad day. It will probably also be their final day. That’s because I have a gun and the will to use it to protect myself and my family.

What good does it do to call the police to have them save you if they can’t get there fast enough to do so? While I’m supportive of the police, I also recognize there are limits to what even the best of them can do. They may want to protect you, but they can’t.

You’d best plan on protecting yourself. If you don’t have one already, get a gun and learn how to use it.

Oct 21, 2021 9:30 PM ET
Oct 21, 2021 6:30 PM ET