An apparently dejected mainstream media is reporting that the Department of Justice lacks the evidence to file civil rights charges against George Zimmerman for daring to defend his life against Trayvon Martin, the violence-prone, drug-abusing teen who ambushed Zimmerman from behind.

While the public waits for a Justice Department announcement over two separate investigations spurred by the summer shooting of an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, the department is going to first announce its findings in the killing of Trayvon Martin.

ABC News has learned Martin’s family will soon be notified that the Justice Department will not be filing charges against George Zimmerman, who shot the 17-year-old after a confrontation in 2012. Thursday marks three years to the day since Martin was killed.

Federal prosecutors concluded there is not sufficient evidence to prove Zimmerman, a neighborhood watchman in Sanford, Fla., intentionally violated Martin’s civil rights, sources told ABC News.

Zimmerman had followed Martin from a distance after spotting the teen lurking near the windows of a home in a condominium community that had suffered a rash of break-ins. Zimmerman was on the phone with a 911 dispatcher when Martin noticed that he was being followed and sprinted for cover.

The portly Zimmerman lost the former football player while attempting to follow him in the dark for responding police, and was on his way back to his truck when Martin stalked up from behind him, sucker punched Zimmerman, and then began a relentless assault that Martin’s friend Rachel Jeantel described as a possible attempted gay bashing.

Zimmerman cried out for help numerous times during the assault, prompting a neighbor to come out and shout at Martin to stop his attack. When Martin instead chose to escalate the battery by attempting to smash Zimmerman’s head on the concrete sidewalk, the attack became an assault with a deadly weapon.

Zimmerman responded to the potentially deadly assault and refusal of his neighbors to intervene by pulling his concealed weapon and firing one shot into Martin’s chest.

A contemporary “selfie” of Trayvon Martin, taken from his phone after his death. While constantly protrayed as a “child” in the media, Martin was engaged in violent street fighting, drug abuse, and apparently dealt in stolen firearms according to data pulled from his cell phone by forensic investigators.

“Social justice” agitators attempted to muddy the waters of the clear-cut self-defense shooting and assert that it was a race-based crime… an interesting claim, considering the fact that Zimmerman was himself tri-racial and known to have close minority friends.

Martin had a significant amount of THC—the active ingredient in marijuana—in his system at his time of death, and contrary to popular media accounts that are still misreported, he did not have “iced tea” in his possession at the time of his death, but something he used for a far darker purpose:

Trayvon Martin didn’t purchase tea, and he didn’t have tea in his possession when he died. He instead had watermelon fruit cocktail, and that is a significant detail with a difference.

When mixed with cough syrup, Skittles and this watermelon fruit cocktail formed “purple drank” which appeared to be Trayvon Martin’s favorite way to get high. Taken in high concentrations, the Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide (DHM) is compared to ketamin or PCP.

Zimmerman was found not guilty of second-degree murder in Martin’s killing, and never should have been charged under basic self-defense laws.

Update: Fox News reports that Attorney General Eric Holder has made a statement about the DOJ’s decision:

“Though a comprehensive investigation found that the high standard for a federal hate crime prosecution cannot be met under the circumstances here, this young man’s premature death necessitates that we continue the dialogue and be unafraid of confronting the issues and tensions his passing brought to the surface,” Attorney General Eric Holder said in written statement. “We, as a nation, must take concrete steps to ensure that such incidents do not occur in the future.”

We would also suggest concrete steps to ensure that such incidents don’t occur in the future, such as not attempting to beat other human beings to death.