SupremeCourt

Senate Republicans has swept aside the grandstanding of Democrats in a move that will result in Judge Neil Gorsuch joining the United States Supreme Court by tomorrow.

Senate Republicans deployed the so-called “nuclear option” Thursday in their drive to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, dramatically changing the way the Senate does business in order to overcome a Democratic filibuster.

In a fast-paced chain of events that clears the way for Gorsuch to be confirmed by Friday evening, majority Republicans changed Senate precedent so that a high court nominee can advance to a final vote with a simple majority of 51 senators, as opposed to 60.

By Senate standards, this was ground-shaking.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., declared he did so to “restore norms” and get past what he called an “unprecedented” Democratic filibuster.

Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., countered that the changes could send the Senate and the nomination process “over the cliff.”

Judge Gorsuch is perfectly qualified for the highest court in the land, and partisan attempts to undermine his confirmation by Senate Democrats made them look foolish.

Gorsuch is a textualist who believes that the Constitution written by the Founders doesn’t need “interpretation,” but instead should be viewed as written, a stance that was utterly unremarkable throughout most of American history. His body of work suggests that he will hold views similar to those of the man he is replacing, Antonin Scalia.

Gorsuch is strongly supported by almost all Second Amendment organizations and his vote on the court should result in all gun rights cases being decided by strict scrutiny, which strongly favors the views of gun rights advocates and the Founding Fathers themselves.