Former Disney channel actor David Henrie, known for his role as Justin Russo on the show “Wizards of Waverly Place,” was arrested and booked by law enforcement at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) after accidentally bringing his loaded firearm to the airport.

According to ABC 7 Chicago, TSA found the firearm when Henrie entered Terminal 2 shortly after 9 a.m. The gun is registered to Henrie and owned legally.

But instead of trying to cast a spell to get him out of his predicament, Henrie cooperated with law enforcement, who proceeded to arrest and book him. Later that evening, Henrie sent out a tweet taking full responsibility for his actions, and he apologized for the trouble he caused. He also thanked the TSA for doing its job and praised the professionalism of the Los Angeles Police Department.

“I take responsibility for the situation at LAX today. I unintentionally brought my legally owned gun which is registered in my name to the airport,” the 29-year-old said.

“I am so sorry for any trouble it caused, but I am appreciative of TSA’s efforts in implementing the safety laws that are in place to protect our beautiful country. More than anything I am humiliated and embarrassed that this even happened. But am thankful to the TSA, LAPD and all involved today for their kindness and their professionalism during this process,” he added.

The LAXPD account graciously replied to Henrie’s tweet. Though he did break the law and was held accountable, the department thanked him for his cooperation and for taking the time to, despite the circumstances, thank them for protecting the public.

“It’s unfortunate you had to meet our officers under these circumstances,” the department tweeted back. “But we appreciate your professionalism and thanking the police officers for doing their jobs. Not something we hear a lot of lately. Safe travels & God bless,” it concluded.

Though Henrie broke the law in this instance, it’s still nice to know there are members of Hollywood who respect the law (despite a mental error), respect the Second Amendment, and honor the work of America’s men and women in blue.