What happens when a state with a training requirement decides to go with permitless carry? Well, for better or worse, the requirement for training has to go away too. After all, how can you require training when you don’t even require a permit?

That’s what’s being considered in Oklahoma, a state that currently has a training requirement but is considering making a move to constitutional carry.

In fact, that bill has now passed the House, and the state’s Senate will now consider it.

A bill in the Oklahoma Legislature that would remove licensing and training requirements for handgun owners cleared the state’s House of Representatives on Wednesday with mostly Republican support.

The bill – House Bill 2597 – passed in a 70-30 vote, with all 24 Democrats in opposition along with a handful of Republicans. A similar bill passed both the House and Senate last year but was vetoed by then-Gov. Mary Fallin over concerns from law enforcement.

“What this does is allow, as the Constitution states, that a person can carry a firearm without having to purchase that right,” Republican state Rep. Kevin West told reporters. “The Constitution clearly states that we have right to keep and bear arms.”

He said the bill would benefit poor people and remove a barrier to gun ownership. If passed, background checks would still be required. Before Wednesday’s session began, gun control advocates dropped off 2,400 signatures opposing the legislation.

Permitless carry does benefit the poor. It also benefits the working class who often have difficulty in making time to go and conduct the application process for a concealed carry permit.

You know, the people Democrats tend to claim they want to help.

Then again, anti-gun Democrats tend to think anyone who wants a gun is a stone-cold killer in the making, just looking for an opportunity to murder minorities for looking at them wrong or something.

And they wonder why we don’t take their fears seriously.

Anyway, constitutional carry would be a huge leap forward for Oklahoma, and I applaud them for this.

Now, the bill will go to the state Senate where the 39-9 Republican majority will likely also pass it, thus sending it to the state’s Republican governor for signing.

While it’s theoretically possible for the bill to be stalled at any point, I’m not sure that’s all that likely. The bill seems to be quite popular in the state, which means it’s unlikely to do anything but pass and make the citizens of Oklahoma freer.

This comes as many states are considering tighter restrictions on guns as a knee-jerk reaction to mass shootings. Meanwhile, Oklahoma is taking a step that may legitimately minimize mass shootings throughout the state. As more people will likely be carrying, there will be more guns in more places to meet any potential threat from a mass shooter.

Do you know what you call a mass shooter who meets an armed citizen? Dead.

This is a win for everyone.