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For the most part, I think of martial arts weapons as novelties. They’re not practical in self-defense situations, nor for pretty much any other real-world application I can think of outside of martial arts.

I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with that, mind you, only that these aren’t the weapons we typically see bad guys using.

However, nunchucks were banned in several places ages ago, probably because of fearful lawmakers who watched way too many Bruce Lee movies. Now, at least one state is trying to change that, and it’s waiting for the governor to decide.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey will decide whether to let people own nunchucks after lawmakers voted Thursday to lift restrictions on the weapons used in martial arts.

Arizona allows people to have nunchucks to prepare for competition, but supporters say those who practice martial arts shouldn’t have to worry they’ll face charges for possessing the weapon made of two sticks or rods connected by a rope or chain.

“The average person can do far more damage using a baseball bat than nunchucks,” said Rep. John Kavanaugh, a Republican from Fountain Hills. “They’re not dangerous to anybody. And we really should let kids and adults who want to do martial arts activities legally possess them.”

Arizona has some of the nation’s most permissive laws around weapons, and lawmakers regularly consider legislation to loosen remaining restrictions.

Critics of decriminalizing nunchucks say they can cause serious harm. Some have said lawmakers should focus on reducing gun violence.

“Instead of figuring out ways that we can save lives, we’re wasting time on nunchucks,” said Rep. Athena Salman, a Tempe Democrat.

Right. Why remove a law that interferes with someone’s recreational activities when they could shut up and do what the Democrats want? It’s not like they don’t deal with all kinds of different laws while in session or anything. They need a laser focus on what Salman thinks is most important.

The truth of the matter is that nunchucks are a non-factor in crime. While some may injure themselves with them, those injuries are typically minor and a good learning lesson.

It’s also worth remembering that the Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear arms. That includes weapons with little practical value in this day and age. That’s probably the real reason Rep. Salman has an issue with this bill.

I mean, what’s going to happen? An upsurge in driveby nunchuck attacks? Are they worried about an influx of ninjas?

Laws need a reason to exist. They shouldn’t remain on the books because there’s no reason to remove them. They interfere with the law-abiding’s ability to do things as they’d like to, so without a compelling reason to be on the books, they shouldn’t be.

Bans against martial arts weapons like nunchucks are a prime example of a law that should be purged from the books. It accomplishes nothing and, as such, needs to go away.

Should the governor sign the bill repealing this idiotic ban, I’ll put money that it won’t create any increase in the crime or accident rates within the state, either.

After all, we’re talking about nunchucks. It’s not like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are kicking off a crime spree in the state after the bill is signed.