Philly Inquirer Editorial Demands Even More Gun Control

(AP Photo/John Locher, File)

The Philadelphia Inquirer is one of the largest newspapers in the state of Pennsylvania, if not the largest. They’re also not big fans of our gun rights.

This isn’t new, of course. We’ve seen enough stories from them to know which way they slanted on the issue of guns.

But their latest editorial makes it clear that even what action President Joe Biden was taking on the issue of guns just isn’t enough for them.

After four long years, and at a time Philadelphia needs it most, there is an occupant in the White House who understands the value of gun control.

Last week, the White House announced initial actions the administration is taking to address gun violence. Unable to impose gun control requirements through executive action, the White House instructed the Department of Justice to draft a model “red flag” law for states to use and craft a federal law enforcement response to the proliferation of “ghost guns.” The plan calls for $5 billion toward a violence interruption program. President Joe Biden also nominated David Chipman, a former Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agent who most recently was a senior adviser for the gun control group Giffords, to head the ATF — an agency that didn’t have a confirmed director since 2015. Biden has also directed the ATF to issue an annual report on gun trafficking.

On Thursday, Biden called gun violence an “epidemic” and “international embarrassment” at a Rose Garden press conference where he discussed his administration’s action.

The new tone from the White House and federal agencies gives hope, but the announcements also revealed the limits of executive action. Through his pen, Biden can tinker around the edges when it comes to actually regulating guns. The president called on Congress to pass the Violence Against Women Act, ban assault weapons, and close background check loopholes. With 60 votes required to break a filibuster in the Senate, it’s hard to imagine 10 Republicans letting any of these measures pass.

Republican obstructionism doesn’t stop in D.C. Bill after bill to reduce the number of guns on Pennsylvania’s streets, and out of the hands of individuals who are a danger to themselves or others, are introduced in Harrisburg, only to languish in Republican-led committees. Meanwhile, Pennsylvania’s background check system experienced record volume for the third consecutive quarter: 427,450 checks before purchase, more than 100,000 more than the first quarter of 2020. The commonwealth is drowning in guns.

In other words, Biden’s efforts just aren’t enough because people can still buy guns.

I mean, why else bring up the number of lawful purchases made in the last few months? These are all purchases that went through licensed dealers, after all, which is the point of universal background checks, is it not? To bring all gun sales through FFL holders?

You know, it’s funny. It’s just odd how often our supposedly unbiased media produces editorials where they openly advocate for things like gun control. We rarely ever see a major publication make a pro-gun stand.

Why, it’s almost like the media is biased as hell and just want people to believe they can compartmentalize their biases.

Look, there are issues in Pennsylvania, sure, but it’s not because of a lack of gun control. In fact, New York City is a good example. Despite maintaining the harshest gun laws in the country, the city has bounced between being one of the most violent cities in the world to one of the safest major cities in the nation. The gun laws haven’t really changed, but other factors did.

The Inquirer editorial board would do well to look into that for their next editorial and maybe consider that restricting people’s rights isn’t the answer.

Somehow, I doubt they will, though.

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May 16, 2021 11:30 AM ET
May 16, 2021 8:30 AM ET