Georgia felon gets 10 years for buying gun with stolen ID

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While much of the focus on guns right now centers around mass shootings, the truth is that they’re really a drop in the bucket when it comes to homicides committed with firearms. Most murders are the result of an armed felon.

That’s a problem because felons cannot legally own a firearm.

However, they get them anyway, usually by breaking the law in some additional way. For one Georgia felon, though, it didn’t work out well.

A Clayton County man who used a stolen identity to buy dozens of guns from licensed dealers around metro Atlanta despite a long criminal history has been sentenced to 10 years in federal prison, officials said.

Dawuan Na’jee Williams, 40, of Jonesboro, pleaded guilty in February to one count of presenting false identification to a federally licensed firearms dealer, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia Ryan Buchanan said. Williams is also facing multiple charges in Florida related to a shooting that took place in Tallahassee, including attempted murder and aggravated assault.

“Because he’s a felon several times over, Williams could not lawfully possess or purchase firearms,” Buchanan said. “He then skirted federal law by utilizing stolen identification information to purchase firearms and will spend the next decade in federal prison.”

Williams bought more than two dozen guns from different dealers around the metro area between May 2020 and June 2021, Buchanan said. Some of those guns have been linked to shootings and other crime scenes.

In other words, Williams presented himself as someone who could lawfully purchase firearms, then did so in order to arm his felon friends.

Luckily, he was caught and prosecuted. Now, he won’t be able to do this.

This is a lesson for a lot of other cities such as San Francisco–though, in fairness to them, they did just ditch their progressive, pro-crime DA, so there’s hope for them. The truth is that if you want to stop crime, you need to go after criminals.

That’s precisely what happened here.

Williams will have the next decade to think about his life choices and not illegally buy firearms that can then be sold to other criminals.

However, Williams is just one example. As noted earlier today, there are a lot of people who lie on ATF paperwork and don’t get prosecuted.

If you want to seriously make a dent in so-called gun crime in this country, this is what you do. You go after criminals who are arming other criminals. You stop trying to create more and more laws for these people to break and focus on actually catching those who are breaking the law.

I know, it’s a novel concept, but it’s crazy enough that it just might work.

In the meantime, Williams will be in prison. Whether he stays there a whole decade or not is up for debate–I tend to figure he’ll be back on the streets in a few years–but, for now, he’s not going to be arming anymore of his felon friends.

I’ll take that win.