Hogg Steps Down From Anti-Gun Group He Co-Founded

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

The Parkland shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was still fresh when the American public first heard of David Hogg. The progressive activist rose to prominence as a supposed survivor of that day’s carnage. He and fellow schoolmates banded together and formed March For Our Lives, an anti-gun group that sought to strip ordinary Americans of their Second Amendment rights.

Granted, that’s not how they phrase it, but whatever.

Yet Hogg has been trying to spin up a pillow fight with Mike Lindell, the owner of My Pillow. In fact, he’s starting a pillow company. Like Cam, I didn’t really want to delve into it here. Yes, it’s hilarious and yes, I’m having a field day making fun of it on Twitter, but it’s not news in and of itself.

However, his stepping down from the group he co-founded makes it news.

This pillow fight has gotten even more serious.

Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg has stepped down from his gun control advocacy group in the wake of his public spat with conservative My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell.

Hogg, 20, announced on Twitter on Thursday that he is taking a leave of absence from his position as a board member for March For Our Lives.

“I’m going to take the time to focus on school, my passions, and my overall well being,” he said in a separate tweet.

Hogg went on to allude to his public confrontation with Lindell last week, when he said he’ll take the conservative on by launching a competing pillow company.

“I feel I must acknowledge that some of my recent actions have undermined my peers within the movement,” Hogg wrote on Twitter Thursday, in explaining his departure from March For Our Lives.

“To my fellow organizers and those I love most, I want to express my deepest apologies.

“You all have been there for me through some of the roughest times of my life, and I also want to thank you for your continued practice of holding me accountable,” he wrote.

“Fellow activists who do not have the platform or privilege that I have reminded me that this work takes unwavering committment.”

Hogg left unsaid whether he is stepping down specifically to take on Lindell.

However, let’s be honest, he’s spent so much of his time on Twitter spinning up about this pillow company that he swears will wreck Lindell–this despite the serious discrepancies in the types of products it seems Hogg’s company will offer–it’s safe to say that much of why he left is likely because of pillows.

Of course, for Hogg, this “company” is nothing more than an excuse for activism. So far, he’s spent far more time working out how the company will fund progressive groups than working out how it’ll actually make any money. I’ve even joked that I’ll start my own pillow company and just do the opposite of whatever Hogg is doing. I should be a billionaire by next Thursday.

Yet this raises the question of what does this mean for the group he helped create?

To be sure, Hogg has been one of the most public faces of March For Our Lives. He’s the one most likely to be asked questions by the media, the one most likely to draw attention, all of that. With him gone, the group has lost its loudest voice.

I’m not sure that’s a bad thing for them, though. Hogg is incredibly polarizing, especially because he doesn’t really understand what the hell he’s talking about. He pops off about guns, but so much of what he says is so easily debunked, it’s not even funny.

With him out of the picture, the group might be able to stay out of that particular part of the limelight and focus on their work. While it may hurt fundraising in the short term, if they can claim a few victories soon–and they’re likely anticipating just that with President Biden in office–they will likely make up that shortfall soon enough.

In fact, they might just end up being taken more seriously without Hogg at the table.

Meanwhile, I suspect his pillow company will either fold within two years, he abandons his progressive pledges, or he takes a big old fat red pill after learning business doesn’t morph to his warped view of reality.